america-wakiewakie

eyesdriftskyward:

Within radical discourse, an appeal to practicality is tantamount to outright silencing, because ‘practicality’ only reasons from within the possibilities & positions of existing structures. This only serves to maintain the status quo. Either contribute, read quietly, or leave.

What would you suggest that is outside the bounds of our notions of practicality then? Also here’s the link again.
http://flemingway.tumblr.com/post/91334377531/hey-guuuyyyysss-im-using-my-white-privilege

And calling people bad just because they’re white is the exact same fucked up logic that was used to justify slavery under the ‘Mark of Cane’ argument. Or original sin. No one is inherently to blame for anything.

america-wakiewakie

america-wakiewakie asked:

Yea, so how should I have a conversation with you while you insult me... UGH. Bye.

flemingway answered:

Giving up that easily isn’t going to help your lower class. The realty is education is, has, and always will be the answer. To ask for anything other than education is to ask for oppression. We have to better the system we have and not tear it all down for the sake of some utopian “equality” you have a political blog. Don’t expect people to always agree with you.

america-wakiewakie:

flemingway:

america-wakiewakie:

Spoken like a reformist. You still are not getting it. I think you believe all education is the same, in which case, contrary to your claims that you understood what I wrote, evidently you don’t. If you had inquired and been authentic in wanting me to explain or to have a conversation of talking with not at each other, I would have. But you’ve been a total fucking asshat so please stop talking to me. 

What do you mean by “reformist” that’s how you ACTUALLY change things in this country. You reform systems. What do you want to do? Have a revolution? Try to institute a modicum of pragmatism to your thought process. I did understand what your essays said, stop assuming I didn’t. What I’m saying is you have an unrealistic view of how the world really works. You reform things. The Civil rights act of 1964 was a reform! So please call me a reformist. Brown V board of education was a reform! So please call me a reformist. They reversed Jim Crow laws from their once disastrous state and instituted a better system of equality. I don’t know what you think changes things in America. Reformists are the practical thinkers, the real workers. Not philosophical rhetoric peddlers like you who get on a pedestal and think that anyone who disagrees with you simply doesn’t “understand” your side. I do understand your side, I understand it well, but that doesn’t mean I agree with it. So thank you for calling me a reformist, that made my day.

Holy shit Jim Crow still exists you fucking idiot. Privileged white guy doesn’t know much about the prison-industrial-complex, BIG SURPRISE there. Because the PIC is a great “better system of equality”. 

Take this basic shit and go read a book. Legislation does not rectify inequality. Jesus you’re basic. 

Jesus fucking mahatma ghandi Christ what the hell are you talking about. You are choosing to believe that Jim Crow still a exists because it allows you to go through life blaming your failures on the system instead of on yourself. You aren’t in prison. You haven’t been a victim of the PIC. I’m a constitutional law major. Don’t push that PIC bullshit on me. African Americans happen to be in the lower class, laws target them, I don’t disagree with that. Don’t push this argument towards that and try to pawn me off as some “white devil” because I don’t agree with you. That makes you sound ignorant. I plan on being a public defender. I want to change the PIC system by keeping the lower class out of prison. You know how we do that? Through reform. So stop feeling sorry for yourself and blaming the white privilege for all of your problems. Jim Crow laws ended a long time ago. But feeling sorry for yourself and blaming others for your own problems sure hasn’t. Don’t ever call me a privileged white person again. That’s bullshit.

america-wakiewakie

america-wakiewakie asked:

Yea, so how should I have a conversation with you while you insult me... UGH. Bye.

flemingway answered:

Giving up that easily isn’t going to help your lower class. The realty is education is, has, and always will be the answer. To ask for anything other than education is to ask for oppression. We have to better the system we have and not tear it all down for the sake of some utopian “equality” you have a political blog. Don’t expect people to always agree with you.

america-wakiewakie:

Spoken like a reformist. You still are not getting it. I think you believe all education is the same, in which case, contrary to your claims that you understood what I wrote, evidently you don’t. If you had inquired and been authentic in wanting me to explain or to have a conversation of talking with not at each other, I would have. But you’ve been a total fucking asshat so please stop talking to me. 

What do you mean by “reformist” that’s how you ACTUALLY change things in this country. You reform systems. What do you want to do? Have a revolution? Try to institute a modicum of pragmatism to your thought process. I did understand what your essays said, stop assuming I didn’t. What I’m saying is you have an unrealistic view of how the world really works. You reform things. The Civil rights act of 1964 was a reform! So please call me a reformist. Brown V board of education was a reform! So please call me a reformist. They reversed Jim Crow laws from their once disastrous state and instituted a better system of equality. I don’t know what you think changes things in America. Reformists are the practical thinkers, the real workers. Not philosophical rhetoric peddlers like you who get on a pedestal and think that anyone who disagrees with you simply doesn’t “understand” your side. I do understand your side, I understand it well, but that doesn’t mean I agree with it. So thank you for calling me a reformist, that made my day.

america-wakiewakie asked:

Yea, so how should I have a conversation with you while you insult me... UGH. Bye.

Giving up that easily isn’t going to help your lower class. The realty is education is, has, and always will be the answer. To ask for anything other than education is to ask for oppression. We have to better the system we have and not tear it all down for the sake of some utopian “equality” you have a political blog. Don’t expect people to always agree with you.

america-wakiewakie
america-wakiewakie:

flemingway:

america-wakiewakie:

flemingway:

america-wakiewakie:

flemingway:

america-wakiewakie:

What if I told you trying to eliminate poverty through “education” is bullshit? Part II | AmericaWakieWakie 
“[T]he interests of the oppressors lie in “changing the consciousness of the oppressed, not the situation which oppresses them,” for the more the oppressed can be led to adapt to that situation, the more easily they can be dominated.”
— Paulo Freire
Earlier this week a child entered into a classroom blankly painted white. The child did as usual, slumping into a wooden, creaky desk dusted with the etchings of hundreds of kids whom before had sat there and, like her now, had grown bored with the lessons of the day and resorted to teaching themselves the art of pencil-sketching. Only upon the lead breaking into the grooves of the desk did she look up from her station, a moment of interest in the world around chased away by the droning-on of authority telling her to listen. 
This is the story of countless youth in classrooms across America. It is a story of teachers too, the story of how they and their administrators have claimed hegemony over knowledge, thereby castrating their very ability to educate anyone let alone themselves. It is a story of why when education is framed within an oppressive system it cannot develop into liberation because it is not OF the people, it is FOR the people… to consume and regurgitate, to make us instruments of our own oppression — to control us.
How does capitalist “education” control us?
 “[A]ll the Indian there is in the race should be dead. Kill the Indian in him, and save the man.”
— Capt. Richard Pratt, U.S. Army
The most powerful weapon to destroy a people’s resistance is to erase their history. Colonial powers learned this early on in their conquest of indigenous peoples, that if they could control the narrative of a people’s history, or erase it altogether, they could then control the thought process by which people would exist and come to know the world. 
And so the process of “teaching” a complex system of normalized indoctrination began; that is, the task of erasing the histories of millions of peoples, creating instead a pseudo-monolithic whole by dismembering or compressing a thousand narratives into one. Expanded to all of America’s oppressed peoples, this has meant the exclusion or tokenizing of our stories to ensure our ways of thinking and knowing are weeded out, or marginalized in one way or another, because they do not (have never) conform(ed) to colonial standards.  
Thus, today a single value system remains dominant: A philosophy of knowing derived from logical and mathematical treatments of people, which holds the exclusive source of all legitimate knowledge as that which can be measured empirically. In the hands of oppressors this philosophy of knowing objectifies people, dehumanizing them into “things” to be analyzed and (based off that analysis) dictated to the when, what, why and how of living. It presupposes itself as the authoritative avenue by which ALL people could ever legitimately know or operate in the world. 
In Pedagogy of the Oppressed Paulo Freire explains:
“The one who is doing the [dictating] defines himself and the class to which he belongs as those who know or were born to know; he thereby defines others as alien entities. The words of his own class come to be the “true” words, which he imposes or attempts to impose on the others: the oppressed, whose words have been stolen from them. Those who steal the words of others develop a deep doubt in the abilities of the others and consider them incompetent. Each time they say their word without hearing the word of those whom they have forbidden to speak, they grow more accustomed to power and acquire a taste for guiding, ordering, and commanding. They can no longer live without having someone to give orders too. Under these circumstances, dialogue [and authentic learning] is impossible.”
No room for knowledge that is introspective, intuitive, or a system by which we may come to truth through collaborative experiences, is acknowledged because it would relinquish power to the oppressed. Within such a framework, what is valued as accepted “education” within institutions represents a single method of pedagogy — what Paulo Freire called “the banking concept of education” — with a curriculum and ways of knowing which reflect only those prescribed by our oppressors. 
Here, Freire expounds on oppressive ways of “teaching”:
“[The banking concept of education] turns [students] into “containers,” into “receptacles” to be “filled” by the teachers. The more completely she fills the receptacles, the better a teachers she is. The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are.
Education thus becomes an act of depositing, in which the students are the depositories and the teacher is the depositor. Instead of communicating, the teacher issues communiques and makes deposits which the students patiently receive, memorize, and repeat… [T]he scope of action allowed to the students extends only as far as receiving, filing, and storing the deposits. They do, it is true, have the opportunity to become collectors or cataloguers of the things they store. But in the last analysis, it is the people themselves who are filed away through the lack of creativity, transformation, and knowledge in this (at best) misguided system. For apart from inquiry, apart from the praxis, individuals cannot be truly human. Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other.”
In the banking concept of education, truth and knowledge are wholly represented by the teacher; whom themselves submit to “a philosophy of knowing derived from logical and mathematical treatments of people, which holds the exclusive source of all legitimate knowledge as that which can be measured empirically.” In this instance, unbeknownst to most educators, they facilitate oppressive ways of knowing by objectifying their students, “dehumanizing them into “things” to be analyzed and (based off that analysis) dictated to the when, what, why and how of living.” They presuppose themselves as the authoritative avenue by which their students could ever legitimately know the world. 
This is the educational paradigm of capitalism. In it any ideas that strengthen the institutionalization of it are good and valued, ingraining it in people’s minds as the entire possible spectrum of education that there is, while any ideas that are introspective, intuitive, or humanizing are shunned as ineffective/inefficient because they or their results cannot be quantified.
The World is Our Classroom & We Are Each Other’s Teachers
“We can legitimately say that in the process of oppression someone oppresses someone else; we cannot say that in the process of revolution someone liberates some else, nor yet that someone liberates himself, but rather that human beings in communion liberate each other.”
— Paulo Freire
It is oxymoronic to think education can serve any aim as noble as the elimination of poverty when it itself is a vessel of our oppression.
Through the banking concept of education we are told by those authoritatively assigned as our “teachers” — inside and outside classrooms — what to think and how to think it. We are taught to be good, subordinate servants. Perhaps most of all, and most debilitating to us, we are conditioned to love our oppressors and to blame ourselves for the systemic problems we face. 
Can’t make rent? Get a second job. Still not enough? Should have gone to college. Did go to college? Should have gone to a better one. Went to a fantastic university? Should have avoided loans. Born into poverty and couldn’t avoid them? Too bad, should have been born rich.
No solutions ever actually emerge because they were never meant to. Capitalists know this. Finding solutions would mean actually dismantling the education of oppression and attacking poverty where it is born — in the hands of the rich.
It would mean realizing classrooms themselves are arbitrary inventions to serve oppressive ways of knowing the world. It would mean seeing each other as the fully complex beings we are and abandoning a system that assumes most of us are incapable of learning, that some of us must fill the rest with our own truth while erasing theirs. It would mean refusing the methods of our oppressors, understanding the best, most authentic way for us to understand ourselves and the world is through and with each other.
(Read Part One of This Series Here)

Yeah, because the best solution to our problems isn’t to give our lower class the tools to achieve their own ends but to accept that our education system is based upon governmentally subsidized teaching and forego any solution.

^^^ Clearly did not read or understand anything I wrote. Great job being a tool about that whole dialogue thing with each other I spoke of. Might do yourself a favor and read Part One. Thanks buddy. 

Well, no I agree with most of it. And if by tool, you mean tool for conversation then yes. In saying that you are perpetrating the very evil you hope to dispel throughout parts one and two. There is a complete lack of communication within our education system. But to realize this standardization and oppressive mislabeling of today’s youth we have to allow for the lower class to open their eyes. I would contend that the capitalist paradigm was not realized as a form of oppression as much as a tool of dealing with the masses. It is sad to realize that many who wander in today’s schools are, in fact, lost. But that doesn’t mean that the way out of poverty isn’t education. That means that the system is what is causing the income gap. Thank you for the intriguing and eye opening philosophical rhetoric.

“In saying that you are perpetrating the very evil you hope to dispel throughout parts one and two.”How is this possible when people can read by their own volition what I write. ..People choose to follow my blog. They choose to read what I write. This is a choice, an internal dialogue to accept after mulling over or reject the themes I present. Then, if they are authentic and curious, they can comment with me or others about it, or message me privately as many do.”There is a complete lack of communication within our education system. But to realize this standardization and oppressive mislabeling of today’s youth we have to allow for the lower class to open their eyes.”Yes, there is a lack of communication because of our model of education does not allow for communication. It is a model of indoctrination which induces children through coercion to memorize or replicate a few particular ways of knowing the world. That’s all, despite the fact that there are thousands of ways of coming to understand the world around us and to be critical about it. The latter part about standardization I don’t really get what you’re trying to say. I do know this: Standardization erases people.  "I would contend that the capitalist paradigm was not realized as a form of oppression as much as a tool of dealing with the masses."A tool to deal with BY oppressing. "But that doesn’t mean that the way out of poverty isn’t education."Education is not possible without communication and communications is not possible without dialogue. Since capitalist education does not allow for dialogue there is, as we both have agreed, no communication, hence without we get a type of pseudo-education. This is why in part one I said, “The only education that challenges and sets out a path to abolish poverty is the radical re-education to dismantle our current mode of living…” Degrees of any kind do nothing to dismantle oppression less they are applied to dismantling our current mode of living.  
"That means that the system is what is causing the income gap."
Again, I’d re-read part one, I deal with systemic issues there. 
 

I would ask what country you live in? And then direct your attention to your former statement. Unless you think your ability to think freely derives from some personal trait passed down to you through a isolated and intelligent gene-Poole. You live in a capitalist system, were educated in the capitalist paradigm of education, and yet still hold the ability to think freely and explore the different possibilities. You are, in that sense, a contradiction of your own argument.

I am still bound by this system. I am still disentangling myself from it. I likely will never be free of it less more people want to and take the time to do the work of dismantling it. Saying I cannot think critically about the system which indoctrinated me, which I had to unlearn and relearn through great effort, is plain stupid. I am not a contradiction, but rather a complex human being thinking critically about the world around me. You, as well as any other, are capable as well as I. The old euphemism goes, you can show a horse to water, you can’t make’em drink. 

Please tell me what you “re-learned”? Is there a new version of Che Gueverre Algebra I need to learn to”free my mind” (which implies my mind is not free as of right now, which is kind of arrogant) from the oppressive chains of the capitalist [insert whatever societally encapsulating tumblerism here] I’m just contending that your mind is already free, and talking about how “oppressed you are” only re-perpetrated the system. You already have a platform, and an audience, and internet, all provided for you by the Unites states. Stop pushing colonialist Indian genocidal rhetoric, and sixties civil rights rhetoric into today’s context when it doesn’t belong. Sure those philosophies were groundbreaking. But they’ve already brought about their change. I work with numerous orgs, etc etc etc as well. I don’t understand how you can be oppressed in a system, and free in a system at the same time. Oppressive systems, (actual oppression) wouldn’t allow you to explore the minds of Malcolm X and other activists throughout history. You, are a bullshit peddler. Looking for injustice and oppression in every nook and cranny, you don’t do anything for society. You leech off of it and then damn it for letting you. The truth is to change the system you don’t just complain about how bad it is.

america-wakiewakie:

flemingway:

america-wakiewakie:

flemingway:

america-wakiewakie:

flemingway:

america-wakiewakie:

What if I told you trying to eliminate poverty through “education” is bullshit? Part II | AmericaWakieWakie 

“[T]he interests of the oppressors lie in “changing the consciousness of the oppressed, not the situation which oppresses them,” for the more the oppressed can be led to adapt to that situation, the more easily they can be dominated.”

— Paulo Freire

Earlier this week a child entered into a classroom blankly painted white. The child did as usual, slumping into a wooden, creaky desk dusted with the etchings of hundreds of kids whom before had sat there and, like her now, had grown bored with the lessons of the day and resorted to teaching themselves the art of pencil-sketching. Only upon the lead breaking into the grooves of the desk did she look up from her station, a moment of interest in the world around chased away by the droning-on of authority telling her to listen.

This is the story of countless youth in classrooms across America. It is a story of teachers too, the story of how they and their administrators have claimed hegemony over knowledge, thereby castrating their very ability to educate anyone let alone themselves. It is a story of why when education is framed within an oppressive system it cannot develop into liberation because it is not OF the people, it is FOR the people… to consume and regurgitate, to make us instruments of our own oppression — to control us.

How does capitalist “education” control us?

 “[A]ll the Indian there is in the race should be dead. Kill the Indian in him, and save the man.”

Capt. Richard Pratt, U.S. Army

The most powerful weapon to destroy a people’s resistance is to erase their history. Colonial powers learned this early on in their conquest of indigenous peoples, that if they could control the narrative of a people’s history, or erase it altogether, they could then control the thought process by which people would exist and come to know the world.

And so the process of “teaching” a complex system of normalized indoctrination began; that is, the task of erasing the histories of millions of peoples, creating instead a pseudo-monolithic whole by dismembering or compressing a thousand narratives into one. Expanded to all of America’s oppressed peoples, this has meant the exclusion or tokenizing of our stories to ensure our ways of thinking and knowing are weeded out, or marginalized in one way or another, because they do not (have never) conform(ed) to colonial standards. 

Thus, today a single value system remains dominant: A philosophy of knowing derived from logical and mathematical treatments of people, which holds the exclusive source of all legitimate knowledge as that which can be measured empirically. In the hands of oppressors this philosophy of knowing objectifies people, dehumanizing them into “things” to be analyzed and (based off that analysis) dictated to the when, what, why and how of living. It presupposes itself as the authoritative avenue by which ALL people could ever legitimately know or operate in the world.

In Pedagogy of the Oppressed Paulo Freire explains:

“The one who is doing the [dictating] defines himself and the class to which he belongs as those who know or were born to know; he thereby defines others as alien entities. The words of his own class come to be the “true” words, which he imposes or attempts to impose on the others: the oppressed, whose words have been stolen from them. Those who steal the words of others develop a deep doubt in the abilities of the others and consider them incompetent. Each time they say their word without hearing the word of those whom they have forbidden to speak, they grow more accustomed to power and acquire a taste for guiding, ordering, and commanding. They can no longer live without having someone to give orders too. Under these circumstances, dialogue [and authentic learning] is impossible.”

No room for knowledge that is introspective, intuitive, or a system by which we may come to truth through collaborative experiences, is acknowledged because it would relinquish power to the oppressed. Within such a framework, what is valued as accepted “education” within institutions represents a single method of pedagogy — what Paulo Freire called “the banking concept of education” — with a curriculum and ways of knowing which reflect only those prescribed by our oppressors.

Here, Freire expounds on oppressive ways of “teaching”:

“[The banking concept of education] turns [students] into “containers,” into “receptacles” to be “filled” by the teachers. The more completely she fills the receptacles, the better a teachers she is. The more meekly the receptacles permit themselves to be filled, the better students they are.

Education thus becomes an act of depositing, in which the students are the depositories and the teacher is the depositor. Instead of communicating, the teacher issues communiques and makes deposits which the students patiently receive, memorize, and repeat… [T]he scope of action allowed to the students extends only as far as receiving, filing, and storing the deposits. They do, it is true, have the opportunity to become collectors or cataloguers of the things they store. But in the last analysis, it is the people themselves who are filed away through the lack of creativity, transformation, and knowledge in this (at best) misguided system. For apart from inquiry, apart from the praxis, individuals cannot be truly human. Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other.”

In the banking concept of education, truth and knowledge are wholly represented by the teacher; whom themselves submit to “a philosophy of knowing derived from logical and mathematical treatments of people, which holds the exclusive source of all legitimate knowledge as that which can be measured empirically.” In this instance, unbeknownst to most educators, they facilitate oppressive ways of knowing by objectifying their students, “dehumanizing them into “things” to be analyzed and (based off that analysis) dictated to the when, what, why and how of living.” They presuppose themselves as the authoritative avenue by which their students could ever legitimately know the world.

This is the educational paradigm of capitalism. In it any ideas that strengthen the institutionalization of it are good and valued, ingraining it in people’s minds as the entire possible spectrum of education that there is, while any ideas that are introspective, intuitive, or humanizing are shunned as ineffective/inefficient because they or their results cannot be quantified.

The World is Our Classroom & We Are Each Other’s Teachers

“We can legitimately say that in the process of oppression someone oppresses someone else; we cannot say that in the process of revolution someone liberates some else, nor yet that someone liberates himself, but rather that human beings in communion liberate each other.”

— Paulo Freire

It is oxymoronic to think education can serve any aim as noble as the elimination of poverty when it itself is a vessel of our oppression.

Through the banking concept of education we are told by those authoritatively assigned as our “teachers” — inside and outside classrooms — what to think and how to think it. We are taught to be good, subordinate servants. Perhaps most of all, and most debilitating to us, we are conditioned to love our oppressors and to blame ourselves for the systemic problems we face.

Can’t make rent? Get a second job. Still not enough? Should have gone to college. Did go to college? Should have gone to a better one. Went to a fantastic university? Should have avoided loans. Born into poverty and couldn’t avoid them? Too bad, should have been born rich.

No solutions ever actually emerge because they were never meant to. Capitalists know this. Finding solutions would mean actually dismantling the education of oppression and attacking poverty where it is born — in the hands of the rich.

It would mean realizing classrooms themselves are arbitrary inventions to serve oppressive ways of knowing the world. It would mean seeing each other as the fully complex beings we are and abandoning a system that assumes most of us are incapable of learning, that some of us must fill the rest with our own truth while erasing theirs. It would mean refusing the methods of our oppressors, understanding the best, most authentic way for us to understand ourselves and the world is through and with each other.

(Read Part One of This Series Here)

Yeah, because the best solution to our problems isn’t to give our lower class the tools to achieve their own ends but to accept that our education system is based upon governmentally subsidized teaching and forego any solution.

^^^ Clearly did not read or understand anything I wrote. Great job being a tool about that whole dialogue thing with each other I spoke of. Might do yourself a favor and read Part One. Thanks buddy. 

Well, no I agree with most of it. And if by tool, you mean tool for conversation then yes. In saying that you are perpetrating the very evil you hope to dispel throughout parts one and two. There is a complete lack of communication within our education system. But to realize this standardization and oppressive mislabeling of today’s youth we have to allow for the lower class to open their eyes. I would contend that the capitalist paradigm was not realized as a form of oppression as much as a tool of dealing with the masses. It is sad to realize that many who wander in today’s schools are, in fact, lost. But that doesn’t mean that the way out of poverty isn’t education. That means that the system is what is causing the income gap. Thank you for the intriguing and eye opening philosophical rhetoric.

In saying that you are perpetrating the very evil you hope to dispel throughout parts one and two.”

How is this possible when people can read by their own volition what I write. ..People choose to follow my blog. They choose to read what I write. This is a choice, an internal dialogue to accept after mulling over or reject the themes I present. Then, if they are authentic and curious, they can comment with me or others about it, or message me privately as many do.

There is a complete lack of communication within our education system. But to realize this standardization and oppressive mislabeling of today’s youth we have to allow for the lower class to open their eyes.”

Yes, there is a lack of communication because of our model of education does not allow for communication. It is a model of indoctrination which induces children through coercion to memorize or replicate a few particular ways of knowing the world. That’s all, despite the fact that there are thousands of ways of coming to understand the world around us and to be critical about it. The latter part about standardization I don’t really get what you’re trying to say. I do know this: Standardization erases people.  

"I would contend that the capitalist paradigm was not realized as a form of oppression as much as a tool of dealing with the masses."

A tool to deal with BY oppressing. 

"But that doesn’t mean that the way out of poverty isn’t education."

Education is not possible without communication and communications is not possible without dialogue. Since capitalist education does not allow for dialogue there is, as we both have agreed, no communication, hence without we get a type of pseudo-education. This is why in part one I said, “The only education that challenges and sets out a path to abolish poverty is the radical re-education to dismantle our current mode of living…” Degrees of any kind do nothing to dismantle oppression less they are applied to dismantling our current mode of living.  

"That means that the system is what is causing the income gap."

Again, I’d re-read part one, I deal with systemic issues there. 

 

I would ask what country you live in? And then direct your attention to your former statement. Unless you think your ability to think freely derives from some personal trait passed down to you through a isolated and intelligent gene-Poole. You live in a capitalist system, were educated in the capitalist paradigm of education, and yet still hold the ability to think freely and explore the different possibilities. You are, in that sense, a contradiction of your own argument.

I am still bound by this system. I am still disentangling myself from it. I likely will never be free of it less more people want to and take the time to do the work of dismantling it. Saying I cannot think critically about the system which indoctrinated me, which I had to unlearn and relearn through great effort, is plain stupid. I am not a contradiction, but rather a complex human being thinking critically about the world around me. You, as well as any other, are capable as well as I. The old euphemism goes, you can show a horse to water, you can’t make’em drink. 

Please tell me what you “re-learned”? Is there a new version of Che Gueverre Algebra I need to learn to”free my mind” (which implies my mind is not free as of right now, which is kind of arrogant) from the oppressive chains of the capitalist [insert whatever societally encapsulating tumblerism here] I’m just contending that your mind is already free, and talking about how “oppressed you are” only re-perpetrated the system. You already have a platform, and an audience, and internet, all provided for you by the Unites states. Stop pushing colonialist Indian genocidal rhetoric, and sixties civil rights rhetoric into today’s context when it doesn’t belong. Sure those philosophies were groundbreaking. But they’ve already brought about their change. I work with numerous orgs, etc etc etc as well. I don’t understand how you can be oppressed in a system, and free in a system at the same time. Oppressive systems, (actual oppression) wouldn’t allow you to explore the minds of Malcolm X and other activists throughout history. You, are a bullshit peddler. Looking for injustice and oppression in every nook and cranny, you don’t do anything for society. You leech off of it and then damn it for letting you. The truth is to change the system you don’t just complain about how bad it is.